Review of Richard Kalich’s Penthouse F

– So we are going to do this like a courtroom drama, or an interrogation?

– Yes. We are. We are indeed.

– Why?

– Because most of the book is done in that style.

 

 

 

 

 

–  I see. Was the book impressive?

– Yes, very impressive. Mr. Kalich is a great writer.

– And he appears in the book too?

– Yes, if it really is him, if you know what I mean…you can call the book postmodern, or that he uses meta-narratives or…

– That all sounds a bit confusing.

– In theory yes, but it’s a very entertaining book. Says a lot about writing. And the creative process. It’s playful, but not flippant. We’re dealing with a serious artist here.

– Oh, really?

 

 

 

 

 

– “He’s an idiot. So disconnected . . . conflicted . . . torn apart.”

– What?

– Just joking. That’s actually a quote from the book. He often sidesteps you like that. Reminds you of people like Gombrowicz.

– Who?

– Oh…never mind. Actually he quotes Gombrowicz in the text. More and more meta eh?

– What?

– “I do not believe that death is man’s real problem, or that art entirely permeated by it is completely authentic. The real issue is growing old, that aspect of death which we experience daily. Yet not even growing old, and that property of it, the fact that it is so completely, so terribly cut off from beauty. Our gradual dying does not disturb us, it is rather the beauty of life becomes inaccessible to us.”

 

 

 

Image result for gombrowicz

 

 

– I’ve no idea what you are talking about.

– You should read more. Educate yourself.

– Back to Mr. Kalich.

– Great writer.

– So you would recommend this novel?

– Of course. It’s the second in the Central Park West Trilogy, lovingly brought back to life by Betimes Books.

– I see.

 

 

 

 

 

 

– And you’ll need to find out what he does with the Boy and the Girl.

– Who?

– The Boy and the Girl. And the whole suicide thing…or was it?

– So it’s a mystery?

– Life is a mystery.

– Quite.

– “He decided to watch everything very carefully and to record it constantly, all with the aim of not missing the smallest detail, because he realized with a shock that to ignore the apparently insignificant was to admit that one was condemned to sit defenseless on the parapet connecting the rising and falling members of the bridge between chaos and comprehensible order.”

– Is that from Mr. Kalich’s book?

– No, that’s a quote from Satantango, by László Krasznahorkai.

 

 

 

 

 

 

– Why are you quoting that? Is it relevant?

– What do you think?

– Well…I…I…

– You lawyers. You really should read more.

 

 

 

You can find my debut novel, Killarney Blues here:

http://viewbook.at/killarneyblues

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3 responses to “Review of Richard Kalich’s Penthouse F

  1. Pingback: Unmissable book at an unbeatable price | Betimes Books

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